Books to look forward to in 2016 – part 1

Naturally, everybody has made a New Year’s Resolution to read more economics books. Here are some forthcoming highlights. I’m starting with the university presses, and as ever favouritism as well as its excellent economics list means Princeton University Press kicks us off.

The PUP Spring 2016 catalogue highlights William Goetzmann’s Money Changes Everything: How Finance Made Civilization Possible; Success and Luck: Good Fortune and the Myth of Meritocracy by Robert Frank; Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality by Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson; Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the United States and Europe by Kenneth Scheve and David Stasavage. There’s also a fantastic list outside economics. I most want to read Frans De Waal’s Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved.

Money Changes Everything: How Finance Made Civilization Possible  Success and Luck: Good Fortune and the Myth of Meritocracy Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality Since 1700 (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World) Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the United States and Europe Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved (Princeton Science Library)

Over at Yale University Press, there’s James Galbraith’s Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe; The Moral Economy by Sam Bowles; the paperback of Natural Capital: Valuing the Planet by Dieter Helm; and What They Do With Your Money: How the financial system fails us and how to fix it by Stephen Davis, Jon Lukomnik and David Pitt-Watson.

Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe The Moral Economy: Why Good Incentives are No Substitute for Good Citizens (Castle Lectures Series) Natural Capital: Valuing the Planet What They Do with Your Money: How the Financial System Fails Us, and How to Fix it

 Oxford University Press has just released Deborah Brautigam’s Will Africa Feed China? Coming soon are: A Few Hares To Chase: The Economic Life and Times of Bill Phillips by Alan Bollard; All The Facts: A History of Information in the United States Since 1870 by James Cortada (going to have to read that one!); China as an Innovation Nation by Yu Zhou, William Lazonick, Yifei Sun; and Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh. There’s also Calestous Juma’s Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies – not yet on Amazon but trailed on Twitter.

Will Africa Feed China? A Few Hares to Chase: The Economic Life and Times of Bill Phillips All the Facts: A History of Information in the United States since 1870 China as an Innovation Nation Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises

 Cambridge University Press has fewer titles aimed at non-specialists. One that caught my eye was The Future of Financial Regulation: Who Should Pay For the Failure of American and European Banks? by Johan Lybeck. For growth folks, Structural Dynamics and Economic Growth edited by Arena and Porter looks a possibility.

The Future of Financial Regulation: Who Should Pay for the Failure of American and European Banks?  Structural Dynamics and Economic Growth

MIT Press has a promising-looking catalogue. On macro, there’s what will be a must-read, Progress and Confusion: The State of Macroeconomic Policy, by Blanchard, Rajan, Rogoff and Summers. Also coming soon are China’s Next Strategic Advantage: From Imitation to Innovation by George Yip and Bruce McKern, and The Disruption Dilemma by Joshua Gans. There’s a couple of interesting-looking edited volumes, Cognitive Unconscious and Human Rationality; and Public Sector Economics and the Need for Reforms. By Hal Scott there is Connectedness and Contagion: Protecting the Financial System from Panics.

Progress and Confusion: The State of Macroeconomic Policy China’s Next Strategic Advantage: From Imitation to Innovation Connectedness and Contagion: Protecting the Financial System from Panics The Disruption Dilemma

I will have to read The Power of a Single Number: A Political History of GDP by Philippe Lepenies from Columbia University Press. Other titles this spring include Economic Thought: A Brief History by Heinz Kurz; The Evolution of Money by David Orrell and Roman Chlupaty; and Inside the Investments of Warren Buffett: Twenty Cases by Yefei Lu.

The Power of a Single Number: A Political History of GDP Economic Thought: A Brief History The Evolution of Money

Forthcoming from Harvard University Press are The Engine of Enterprise: Credit in America by Rowena Olegario; Finding Time: The Economics of Work Life Conflict by Heather Boushey; From Steel to Slots: Casino Capitalism in the Post-Industrial City by Chloe Taft; From The War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America by Elisabeth Hinton; Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization by Brank Milanovic; Imagined Futures: Fictional Expectations and Capitalist Dynamics by Jens Beckert; The Great Leveler: Capitalism and Competition in the Court of Law by Brett Christophers; and Legislating Instability: Adam Smith, Free Banking and the Financial Crisis of 1772 by Tyler Beck Goodspeed. Lots of enticement here.

The Engine of Enterprise: Credit in America From Steel to Slots: Casino Capitalism in the Postindustrial City From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America The Great Leveler: Capitalism and Competition in the Court of Law

Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization Imagined Futures: Fictional Expectations and Capitalist Dynamics Legislating Instability: Adam Smith, Free Banking, and the Financial Crisis of 1772

Inevitably, this is only a partial list. If any publishers particularly want to flag up something I’ve omitted to readers of this blog please let me know – I’m happy to update this post, and one covering other publishers’ forthcoming titles will follow.

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8 thoughts on “Books to look forward to in 2016 – part 1

  1. Pingback: Forthcoming economics books for 2016 – Part 2 | The Enlightened Economist

  2. Ms Coyle
    Thanks for the update, although with 300+ books on my Amazon wishlist already you are not doing me any favours! as long as I can retire on time and live to be 120 I should get through them; always assuming they don’t publish any more.

  3. Diane, You should definitely be reading and reviewing the new book by Scott Sumner, “The Midas Paradox,” one of the most important books ever published on the Great Depression. Scott is one of the leaders of the group of thinkers known as “Market Monetarists,” whose views on monetary policy and advocacy of central banks targeting Nominal GDP is gaining adherents steadily.

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